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poultry:
benefits and costs

which breeds
 to keep?

our breeds

poultry for
 meat

feeding 
chooks

fencing
for chooks
housing 
for chooks

the 
chook run

breeding and
raising chicks

building our own 
incubators

pests and
diseases

buying
chooks

 

Breeds we have had over the years

note: at this time (August 2013) we do not breed for public sale 

 

Welsummer
 Welsummers are medium sized birds with a colouring that is a bit similar to the jungle fowl, which is the ancestor of all domestic chickens. We like the looks of the Welsummer roosters because they remind us of the roosters that were common in Europe when we were children. They will lay about 160 large brown eggs per year. They are strong and robust birds that are excellent foragers. They are not flighty and can be handled easily. Welsummer roosters will protect their flock against predators. When our Welsummers were attacked by three wedge-tailed eagles the rooster fought the eagles to the end and gave the rest of the flock time to escape into the bushes. Welsummers originate from the Netherlands and were developed around 1900. They were bred as a dual-purpose fowl. 

 

Salmon Faverolles
Salmon Faverolles are a French breed and were developed in the 1860s in the community of Faverolles. Faverolles are quite rare in Tasmania. Faverolles come in different colours, but we like the standard salmon coloured birds best. Faverolles were also bred as a dual-purpose fowl. They are average egg layers and lay up to 150 creamy coloured eggs per year. Faverolles are the clowns of the poultry world. They have owl-like feathers in their face, feathered legs and five toes. Faverolles are very friendly. They are quite inquisitive and always come running up to us. They are the only breed we have that likes to be picked up from the ground. The hens would make ideal companions for children. The roosters are magnificently coloured birds. Another big advantage of Faverolles is the heavy feathering. They are hardy birds and they are supposed to adapt well to Tasmania’s cold and wet winters. Faverolles hens will go broody and make very good mothers.

 

Minorca 
Minorcas are a Mediterranean breed. Other Mediterranean breeds are Leghorns, Anconas and Andalusians. Minorcas were first brought to England in the 1830s. They are light birds and they were kept as egg layers rather than for their meat. They are long legged and can be flighty and nervous. They are not ideal birds to keep around children, because they are easily scared and can panic. Minorcas will not go broody. They have black-blue feathering, a big comb and large white earlobes. They are more prone to suffering from the cold than heavier breeds. We really enjoy the looks of these stately black birds that carry themselves with such grace. We have not found our Minorcas to be overly flighty or easily scared, but they always have a lot of room to move. We would not suggest to keep them in a small confined area. Our Minorcas seem to lay around the same number of eggs per year as the other heritage breeds, that is around 160 eggs rather than the 200 we had hoped for, but they are big white eggs. 

     

New Hampshire
 New Hampshires are an American breed with reddish-brown colouring. They were developed in the United States and first officially recognised as a breed in 1935. They are readily available in Tasmania.  They were developed as a dual-purpose breed and lay light brown eggs. They will go broody. They have a good reputation as meat chickens in the USA, but the New Hampshires we usually see in Tasmania seem to be smaller and more suited to be kept as egg layers. New Hampshires are very friendly and inquisitive birds. 

     

Light Sussex
Another breed that is readily available in Tasmania and is gentle and docile are the Light Sussex. They are well adapted to Tasmania’s cold climate and are heavy fowl. Because of their size they need more food per bird. They are good egg layers. Light Sussex are quiet birds and easily contained. 

     

Rhode Island Red
Rhode Island Reds are large chooks that were developed in Massachusetts and Rhode Island in the 19th and early 20th century. They are a classic barnyard breed and are readily available in Tasmania. They are a dual purpose breed and they are supposed to be very good egg layers. Rhode Island Reds are impressive large birds that are good natured and not nervous. They are the heaviest birds we have had and are not suited for small gardens as they are very good scratchers and can do a lot of digging in a short time. 

     

Lavender Araucana
Araucanas are quite different from all other breeds of chooks. They originate from South America and they lay bluish-green eggs. Araucanas are a light breed. Our experience is that they are very economical to keep because they do not need as much feed as the larger breeds. They are not heavy scratchers which makes them easy to keep in smaller backyards. Our Araucanas are easily confined and have turned into quiet birds which are not nervous or flighty. They are our best egg layers. They hatched in October, started laying in May and continued all through winter. At the end of August they laid an average of four eggs per hen per week. 

     

Plymouth Rock
Plymouth Rocks are an American breed and were first exhibited there in 1869. Plymouth Rocks became extremely popular in the United States because of their hardiness and excellent qualities as egg layers and meat birds. They are a lot less common these days. Plymouth Rocks are gentle giants that lay large pinkish-brown eggs. They make good broody hens and mothers. They are long-lived with a very hearty appetite. Plymouth Rocks are quiet and make very good companions. 

poultry:
benefits and costs

which breeds
 to keep?

our breeds

poultry for
 meat

feeding 
chooks

fencing
for chooks
housing 
for chooks

the 
chook run

breeding and
raising chicks

building our own 
incubators

pests and
diseases

buying
chooks

 

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Home

Poultry & eggs for sale

Poultry info Garden 
Diary
Alphabet of Gardening Our
Recipes
Gardening 
Calender
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Resources
Disclaimer

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